When you are submitting a grant application or a journal article for consideration, there are several mistakes that many people make. There is nothing that makes a reviewer more frustrated than seeing these five mistakes. Don’t be that person. 

Be cognizant of what you are doing and be intentional about every action and every great idea. 

  1. Weak Foundation – Understand your Theory, Frameworks, and Models

    • Brush up on your implementation science skills. Can you distinguish the difference between theories, models and frameworks? Did you select the appropriate and relevant theories to lay the groundwork for your own approach?
  2. Haphazard Methodology – How you Obtained and Analyzed your Results

    • Did you have a plan in place? Or did you haphazardly put together your results a chaotic Excel spreadsheet with random calculations and percentages?
  3. Clear, Simple Sentence Structure – Understand Grammar

  4. Retrospective Project Planning – AKA: Lack of Upfront Planning

    • The classic questions go something like: What did we set out to do? What actually happened? Why did it happen? Spend some time at the start of each great idea to write down a plan of action. Think about the problem and visualize several avenues towards your solution.
      • (SIDE NOTE: Notice that I said “at the start of each great idea” not “at the start of each project.” This was intentional. MOST of the time, you’re projects start with the phrase “well, that was interesting” and not “let’s plan a project.” Be cognizant of what you are doing and be intentional about your actions. 
  5. Quick Deadlines and the Odds Are Against You

    • Don’t be afraid to ask for help if you’re cutting it close and need an extra hand. But, it would be better if you don’t allow yourself to procrastinate or get off-task in the first place. Get rid of every possible distraction around you and make a decent plan of attack.